Norma Thompson

Norma Thompson's picture
Senior Lecturer in Humanities; Senior Lecturer Yale College Humanities
53 Wall St, New Haven, CT 06511-8916
(203) 432-0675

Bio

NORMA THOMPSON is Associate Director of the Whitney Humanities Center and Senior Lecturer in the Humanities.  She received her A.B. from Bowdoin College and her Ph.D. from The Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her scholarship and teaching are in the humanities, with special interests in political philosophy and politics and literature.  She is the Director of Undergraduate Studies for the Humanities major in Yale College.
 
Her latest book is Unreasonable Doubt: Circumstantial Evidence and the Art of Judgment (Paul Dry Books, 2011), first published by the University of Missouri Press in 2006.  She has published two books with Yale University Press: Herodotus and the Origins of the Political Community: Arion’s Leap (1996) and The Ship of State: Politics and Statecraft from Ancient Greece to Democratic America (2001).
 
She edited the volume Instilling Ethics with Rowman and Littlefield (2000) and has also published in Arion, Nomos, International Journal of the Classical Tradition, Perspectives on Political Science (2015, 2017), Western Civilization and the Academy (2015) and in the festschrift for David Grene, Literary Imagination, Ancient and Modern. She has articles on Herodotus and Thucydides in The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek Political Theory (2009) and in The Encyclopedia of Political Thought (Wiley Online Library, 2014).  Her latest book project is entitled Trials of Uncertainty.

History

Norma
Thompson
Department: 
FASWHS Whitney Humanities Ctr
Division: 
FAS
People Type: 
Associated Faculty

Publications

Norma Thompson opens a new angle of political vision in this imaginative and engaging interpretation of Herodotus’ History.

This provocative and illuminating book provides a new perspective on the development of political thought from Homer to Machiavelli, Tocqueville, and Gertrude Stein (who is introduced here, for the first time, as a writer of political significance).

“Part detective story, part social commentary, part intellectual autobiography, part philosophical analysis, this is a jury book unlike any other.”—Anthony Kronman, Sterling Professor of Law and former dean, Yale Law School