Special Courses

As part of our commitment to undergraduate education, our faculty are constantly devising innovative new courses. 

Programs for First-Years are listed under First-Year Offerings.

Featured Courses:

Featured below are just a few recent highlights and experiments.  Click here for a complete list of courses devised in the spirit of the interdisciplinary mission of the Humanities Program.

    This course explores the innovative narrative strategies that have ushered in a new Golden Age of TV. Careful visual and textual analysis of episodes is complemented by critical readings and comparisons to literature and cinema.

    Fall 2019
    TTh 11.35-12.50

    A close examination of key works by three of the art’s greatest directors: Fritz Lang, Jean Renoir, Ingmar Bergman. Analysis of cinema’s relation to social history and other arts and the theory and practice of film criticism.

    Fall 2019
    W 1:30-3:20; M: 6:30 (screenings)

    The representation of the human body in law and literature. Bodies as physical structures that inhabit multiple realms, including material, cultural, historical, and symbolic. Sources include film, television, and journalism.

    Fall 2019
    Th 1:30-3:20

    Is the demise of the trial at hand? The trial as cultural achievement, considered as the epitome of humanistic inquiry, where all is brought to bear on a crucial matter in an uncertain context. Inquires into character, doubt, and diagnosis.

    Fall 2019
    MW 2:30-3:45

Core Seminars: Interpretations and Modernities

Humanities Majors are required to take one seminar in “Interpretations” and one seminar in “Modernities.”  Both core courses include substantial attention to methodological concerns that are fundamental to the humanities disciplines, and to distinctively humanistic activities like persuasion and interpretation. Click here for more information and past core courses

    HUMS 352: Survey of major ideas, writings, and cultural movements that have shaped American life and thought from 1880 to 1990: works of fiction, philosophy, social and political thought, and film.  HURP

    Spring 2020
    TTH 11:30am-12:50pm

    HUMS 415: An exploration of Chartres Cathedral as a meeting point of various artistic, technological, ritual, literary, intellectual, and social trends in the High Middle Ages. HU

    Fall 2019
    MW 1:00-2:15pm

    HUMS 290: Brazilian and Japanese novels from the late nineteenth century to the present. Texts from major authors are read in pairs to explore commonalities and divergences.  HU  Tr

    Fall 2019
    M 1:30-3:20

    HUMS 206: We read the Arabian Nights, discuss its dominant themes, and explore the ways its themes and tales have been adapted and appropriated by later authors. HU

    Fall 2019
    MW 9:00-10:15am

Franke and Shulman Seminars

The Franke and Shulman Seminars are upper-level seminars for Humanities majors conducted in conjunction with the Franke and Shulman Lectures; a series of four visiting lectures in the Whitney Humanities Center
 

This course examines selected case studies of marginal and fringe practices of radio broadcasting across its history. Prominent experts, scholars, and practitioners visit the course. 

Fall 2019
M 1:30-3:20

This course draws from feminist, postcolonial, and indigenous studies, critical race theory, and multispecies thought to explore questions in metaphysics, history of science, and politics. 

Spring 2020
M 1:30-3:20

Special Admissions

Below are a number of courses that require instructor permission, application, or have otherwise irregular entrance procedures. Click here for a complete list.

The complexities of poetic influence in the traditions of the English language, from Shakespeare to Keats.

Fall 2019
Th 1:30-3:20

A reading of Shakespeare’s histories, comedies, and poems, with an emphasis their influence on Western representation.

Fall 2019
T 1:30-3:20

Interdisciplinary examination of the uniqueness of the American experience from the time of the Puritans to the Civil War. Readings draw on major works of political theory, theology, and literature. HU

Fall 2019
TTh 2:30pm-3:45pm