Archive

This course considers the concept of “treasure” by visiting nearly all of Yale’s galleries, museums, and library special collections. We explore questions around how these objects and materials were created and how they came to be at Yale.

Spring 2021
T 1:00-4:00

Study of how fantasy ideas about race and gender, good and evil, and religion and culture reflect and influence changing ideas about what it means to be human. Authors include Neil Gaiman, Ursula K. LeGuin, Octavia Butler, & Nalo Hopkinson. 

Spring 2020
T 1:30pm-3:20pm

Study of the creative interactions produced by informal associations of innovative minds in literature, philosophy, politics, science, psychology, the arts, war, and law. 

Fall 2019
MW 9am-10:15am

An introductory course on the art of watercolor as a humanistic discipline. Readings, discussions, and studio work emphasize critical, creative thinking through “learning by doing” study.

Fall 2019
W 2:30pm-5:30pm

Humanistic study has always been a tool for posing the big questions. In a class divided into two halves but taught by both instructors, we will explore these two concerns beginning with Gilgamesh and ending with the present. 

Fall 2019
MW 1–2:15pm

The aims of the course are to have students learn about the workings and history of the system of capital punishment in the U.S and decide whether the experiment is succeeding or failing—why and how.

Spring 2021
TTh 1pm-2:15pm

 This first-year seminar considers the relationship between science and the humanities by looking at several intersections throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. 

Fall 2019
MW 9:00-10:15am

This European intellectual history seminar explores the epistemological question in philosophy: does the world really exist? How do I know it’s really there and not just a projection of my consciousness? is there such a thing as truth? 

Spring 2021
MW 9-10:15